the eagles have landed

They made an appearance at the nest again…. of course they’re way across the river pretty much in the shade, but I did the best I could.eagles-1First look, the pair… looking both ways?eagles-2

 

eagles-3

 

eagles-4

 

eagles-5When the eagles are silent, the parrots begin to jabber. 
― Winston Churchill

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41 thoughts on “the eagles have landed

  1. We had a lot of eagles in Iowa and one could sometimes see them scavenging in the fields after harvest. They are indeed mighty and beautiful.

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    • I seem to have a love-hate relationship with these scavengers. They are impressive birds, but they are scavengers after all. What irks me most is that they’ll steal a catch from the ospreys. Probably other birds, too.

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    • I stumbled on this nest quite by accident last July. Have been keeping an eye on it ever since. I was thinking they may have abandoned it, but there they were! Thrilling!

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    • I don’t check the nest as often as I might because it’s along the longer route to the beach, but I do make it a point to go that way now and again. I’ll continue to keep an eye on it.

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  2. Nice shots, particularly the last one!

    My Florida eagle which I have blogged about before has just now returned for the winter to the lake I frequent. His favorite food is coots, which have not shown up yet, so rather grumpily he has to settle for fish. 🙂

    And yes, that’s my understanding too, some eagles (and Osprey) migrate, some don’t.

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    • I think I was getting the hang of balancing the longer lens by that last shot. Not an easy thing with a pup in my lap wanting to see what was out there. Perhaps the coots know your eagle is hanging out there waiting for them and they’ve found a better neighborhood.

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  3. Very good shots! It’s still hard for me to believe that eagles would start nesting this time of year, but the weather is much different out there than here. Some of our eagles are migrating to winter feeding waters right now.

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    • I couldn’t tell you for sure, but I suspect these guys hang around here year round. The climate is surely mild enough and their perch is just above the river. It seems to be hit or miss when they’re actually at the nest, so I doubt that their actually ‘nesting’.

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    • According to http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/ not all eagles migrate. Apparently it depends on food source. So I suspect my guess was correct that mine have no need to go elsewhere since the rivers around here don’t freeze. I suppose the next question might be whether (or why?) they hang around the nest when they’re not breeding.

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      • Not all of ours migrate either, just the ones that nest near water that freezes in the winter. Around here, they also move closer to the Great Lakes to feed on salmon in the fall, and steelhead in the spring.

        Eagles are known to hang out around the nest, even the juveniles from last summer. But the two in your photos appear to be working on the nest in the one shot.

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  4. Eagles! Nice work – it looks like you coped with the distance issue very well because most of the shots appear to be pretty sharp. The second image is my favorite. We have them here but I haven’t figured out where/how to set up for good captures with a 300 mm. Hope to see more!

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    • Thanks. I didn’t dare get out of the car for fear of spooking them. The first one was shot at 300mm, but I used the 2.0 teleconverter for the individual shots. I’m trying to figure out some sort of beanbag prop to use from inside the car for any future shots, ’cause shooting at 600mm gets pretty iffy.

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      • I don’t use a window tripod but have used both a gun shooters bean bag/rest and a piece of foam pipe insulation (sliced lengthwise to fit over window edge) with some success. Several Bald Eagles winter here, both mature and IM, and their winter diet includes dead deer and dead farm animals.

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    • It seems I’ve been lucky enough to have them somewhere nearby the last 30 years, or so. They are fun to watch. Just think how close we came to wiping them out altogether.

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