road hazards

boulderI more or less expect rock or mudslides or trees to fall over along the road to the beach when the ground is wet and saturated, but didn’t think I’d find this blocking a lane on the way home when it’s been exceptionally dry.boulder-2The road department dude directing traffic said that dry weather can also cause the rocks to shear off….. He also expected more of that formation to follow. Now there’s a reassuring thought.boulder-3This could have put a good dent in the car if we’d left the beach perhaps an hour earlier…. this shows just how far those chunks of rock tumbled. The middle shot shows the spot where the boulders broke away. You can also see what’s left more or less hanging -and likely to follow.

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24 thoughts on “road hazards

    • No, I definitely wouldn’t. As a matter of fact, I’m now a bit uneasy heading down that road especially last night coming home after sunset. But that, too, will pass after a bit, I’m sure.

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    • I think what annoys the most is all those ‘falling rock’ warning signs where I’ve searched to see them tumbling, but how come this one didn’t get its sign? Perhaps this will encourage them to provide the appropriate sign. Makes me wonder if the others weren’t an afterthought, too?

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    • Yes. Glad we weren’t in a hurry to head home earlier. Hard to say exactly but it must have happened not long after we drove past this spot on the way to the beach. We would have been on that inside lane on the way back. Hate to think of what it might have done to the car, not to mention us…. 😦

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  1. This looks very much like our Chuckanut Drive along Bellingham and Skagit Bay. Rocks are always cleaving off and closing the road. Fortunately it is rare that someone gets hit by them.

    Ron

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    • We get fairly frequent rock or mud slides, though it seems there are more of them in winter when the ground is saturated. Luckily there don’t seem to be too many fatalities. I remember a nerve-wracking drive during one of our wild and windy winter storms along this same road when the trees were leaning out virtually horizontally across the road. I was holding my breath in quite a few spots. I also get a kick out of a fairly frequent scenario of guys in pickups (presumably loggers) jumping out with their chainsaws to clear a tree blocking the road…. our great Pacific Northwest in action! πŸ˜€

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  2. This occurs quite frequently in Colorado and occasionally is fatal to an unsuspecting traveler. Because CO has such extreme weather….freezing, thawing, moisture, and drought all contribute to the rocks sheering off. Then the pain of road closures follow until the boulders are cleared. Such is the price one pays to live amongst such beauty πŸ˜‰

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    • I’m used to rocks and trees and roads dropping off cliffs in winter, but this came as a surprise to me in summer. Now that I think about it, it makes perfect sense. I’ll definitely take my chances in order to live in this marvelous country. I suspect the remaining overhang will be gone by the time I head down that road Wednesday. I doubt the road will be closed for long – possibly only the length of time it takes to blow the remainder of that boulder hanging there in midair. I met the heavy equipment headed to it before I got home Saturday.

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  3. I ride a lot on my mountain bike most of the year except when the snow is too high – long periods of drought seems to be the most dangerous and insidious because of desiccation – then the ground is cracking whereby rocks and stones let loose – thoughtful photos, very well captured… πŸ™‚

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    • Wouldn’t have wanted to be there when it came crashing down. The guy said they were probably going to blow up the rest of it to prevent it from falling on someone.

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    • Luckily there isn’t a whole lot of traffic along this road (perhaps a bit more in summer). I was able to pull past the rock slide and get out to catch these shots What fascinated me was the remaining bits just hanging there in midair.

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