the bald eagle

I can’t imagine what I’ve done to deserve it, but I seem to be stumbling into a bunch of bird shots lately…BaldEagle-This one caught my attention not far from where I had snapped the previous heron shot. At first I thought that was a snake the bird had captured. It was pretty far out there, so it was hard to tell. This shot (at 250mm) and HIGHLY cropped tells a different story. I couldn’t tell until I downloaded the picture that it’s actually a large twig. It did prompt me to watch to see where the bird was headed.BaldEagle--2This tree was far enough away from me, that I couldn’t tell for sure what I suspected. Looks like a Bald Eagle doing some nest building. Now, if I can just get me a better zoom lens and remember specifically which tree that was along the road….. Β I’m thinking there may be some chicks coming along at some point.BaldEagle-6883

Each man had only one genuine vocation – to find the way to himself….His task was to discover his own destiny – not an arbitrary one – and to live it out wholly and resolutely within himself. Everything else was only a would-be existence, an attempt at evasion, a flight back to the ideals of the masses, conformity and fear of one’s own inwardness.
― Hermann Hesse

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37 thoughts on “the bald eagle

    • Ahh, but now they’re not smiling so much. The birds seem to have all vacated the nests. I’m betting I found them a bit late in the cycle. WIll have to watch for them earlier in the year next time. But thank you so much for the lovely compliments.

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    • They have been incredibly lucky. Then when I go out and TRY to find the birds, they don’t show up! Frustrating. Apparently one needs to practice patience… or somthing. πŸ˜‰

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    • Found and noted the location today, though the nest appeared empty and I couldn’t linger. But lucky, lucky indeed. I will be keeping an eye on that nest for sure.

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  1. It looks to me as if both adults are in the nest in these shots. I don’t know how familiar you are with the nesting habits of eagles, but they will add to the nest even after the young have hatched.The eagles here lay their eggs the end of March, first of April, it seems very late in the year for the ones in your area to be just starting now. But then, you have much different weather than here.

    You don’t have to remember the exact tree, just the area where the tree was. Hang around there, and the eagles carrying sticks for the nest and food for the young will “remind” you of where the nest is.

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    • I tried to zoom in a bit more on the middle shot where it does look as though there could be another bird with its head down to the left of the other, more visible one. But things start getting pretty murky zooming in any past the heavy cropping I did already. The nest was a good distance away, so my 250mm didn’t have quite enough reach. I have no idea of nesting habits, but it’s been warmer than usual here this summer.

      Thanks for the suggestion to look for the birds flying to the nest. That should help indeed.

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    • I hope I can find that tree again, too. I wasn’t at all sure I’d have anything noteworthy until I got home and downloaded and zoomed in. Should have paid a bit more attention. πŸ˜‰

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    • Hah! IF ONLY!!! Nearest camera store is a mere three hour drive into the valley with much warmer temperatures than I enjoy here. Then there’s that small matter of remembering just where that tree was. I never would have found that nest in that particular tree if the branch-carrying eagle hadn’t shown me the way. But I’ll certainly try! πŸ˜‰

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