Spring forward….

Don’t know about the rest of the world, but here in the States it’s time to push our clocks one hour ahead.

An American Robin…

 

Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.
― Marthe Troly-CurtinPhrynette Married

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44 thoughts on “Spring forward….

    • A fox would be a great deal harder to capture. These guys are generally the first sign of spring arriving. They arrive in large numbers and aren’t at all shy of people. I shot this one from my kitchen window out in my backyard. So it was almost too easy.

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  1. I believe its just North America… this was a change made by the Bush administration to increase Daylight Saving Time by 1 month (3 weeks in spring & 1 week in Fall). So we’re slightly off the rest of the world. Personally I just like longer days 🙂

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    • I never found my days to be any longer. Back when I was commuting, I’d just start to get a hint of daylight on my drive to work in the spring when they’d push the clocks forward making me drive in the dark for a longer another month (?or thereabouts?). But what I hate most is the way it messes with my sleep. I have a hard enough time without having them changing the clocks twice a year. At least it’s a bit more bearable now that I’m retired, but I still don’t like it.

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  2. And so we have sprung, Robins and all. I’m still amazed when I hear the geese overhead…still love it…. We had some beautiful sun on our mountains today, too…and very bright reflections from the snowy trails up in the canyons…am so looking forward to the green and warmth of real Spring…..

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    • I thought our winged friends (including the geese and herons and egrets) would have disappeared with the flooded pastures, but they’re still wading around out there. Of course our recent rain helped to keep things a bit swampy out there for awhile yet. Soon….

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  3. Spring is indeed around the corner when you start to see this little guy. Great photos Gunta. Here in AZ they do not turn their clocks forward or backward so once we leave this state, we are in for a bit of a shock as we head further east.

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  4. i miss the redwing blackbirds which were the true harbingers of spring in the farmland areas. The robins came too of course, and the goldfinches yellowed up, but it was the redwings that really trumpeted spring with their posing on all the fence posts.

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    • We don’t seem to get the redwings around here, but we sure had a gazillion goldfinches around our feeders. It took me awhile to realize that they didn’t migrate in the winter, just changed their coats.

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  5. Guess I can allow myself to be late one day a year. 🙂 The grounds were mowed here Friday, and yesterday like magic the robins appeared. The tilt of their head is funny to watch, and to think they can actually hear the sound of an earthworm is a wonder!

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    • This was taken before my grass was mowed, so apparently they’re not too fussy. I can’t help but wonder if that business about hearing the earthworms has been scientifically proven or it’s just because it looks that way. 😕

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  6. Your first portrait is such a definite pose and thoroughly wonderful, I picture both of you preparing for the click! I’m not sure I’ve seen one done with this kind of clarity, I feel as if I’m meeting the Robin first time. I love their egg color. Clever bird. And the white dots around the eye so beautiful. Nature does a lot of eye decoration I think to expand the size and make a more ferocious look. What colors. Lovely, all of it, grasses, the sense of privacy in some hidden place, and your blue tones.

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    • Thank you. I was pretty thrilled that the little guy agreed to pose so wonderfully for me! Catching these shots truly helps me in identifying these lovely winged creatures. Apparently the eye enhancement is somewhat common in nature. I’m thinking of a butterfly with a pattern that looks like a huge eye on its wings. Then someone once explained to me that my Siberian Husky had some markings above his eyes so that he would look awake even when sleeping. Nature in all of her variations is simply wonderful!

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  7. Lovely pictures of the American robin Gunta. Your responses to some of the comments do make me smile sometimes.. the one above about American robins being larger for example.. As for all this clock shuffling.. it’s just plain daft. As far as I can tell, the day is the same length regardless of what the clock says. If it’s lighter in the mornings, it’s darker in the evenings so, kids in winter get to go to school in the light.. erm, and come home in the dark or go to school in the dark and yep, I think I’ve got this, come home in the light.. 😐

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    • I think daft sums up so many things….. including our “American diet” as well! I have enough of a problem with sleep issues. Like I really don’t need this clock shifting to complicate everything.

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    • I’m a bit surprised you haven’t seen one because they seem so ubiquitous (perhaps not in Florida?) I liked the Feather’s quote enough to make it part of my header. So very, very apt.

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    • He’s showing off his best side! 🙂 I don’t know how true it is, but I’ve heard they actually listen for the earthworms they feed on. It sure looks like he’s cocking his head to hear better.

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    • The only thing I ever found that remotely made sense was that stores and businesses wanted the extended daylight hours to encourage more shopping. Otherwise it doesn’t make a lick of sense (not that I think that theory actually does either.)

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