Rogue River Jet Boat – II

The 80 mile (129 km) trip included some really mild rapids (that’s mild-with an M not a W). There is a longer 104 mile (167 km) trip that adds some wilder rapids. I opted for the shorter version not wanting to leave the pup with neighbors for that long.

Some lovely serene country here with a rare cabin in places that were grandfathered in when it was designated a scenic river area.

This time of year you can see how shallow the water is by the water stains on the rocks. This is also part of the mild rapids section we navigated. The water level drops once the snow melt is gone from the mountains and there’s precious little rain during the summer months. Then we make up for it in the rainy winter months.Plenty of water for a kayak though. This guy asked to be sprayed by the boat to cool off. The further we went inland, away from the ocean, the warmer it got. It’s why we try to dress in layers around here.

I try to imagine how serene and peaceful this might be without the roar of the motor boats or jet boats.

I bet this little trickle becomes a far more impressive waterfall come springtime.The only critter I happened to see on the trip….  I missed an otter and a deer that appeared on the other side of the boat. That rock really doesn’t look like a comfortable place to perch, but it didn’t seem to faze this harbor seal, nor did our boat. The locals aren’t too fond of these guys because of all the fish they catch.Back into the fog again as we approached the harbor where it cooled down enough to please me.

Just another bit of trivia….  parts of the movie The River Wild (1994) with Meryl Streep and Kevin Bacon were shot on this river.

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38 thoughts on “Rogue River Jet Boat – II

    • It was a beautiful day! No denying that. The water was very shallow – we haven’t had any rain for months (typical Oregon weather), but we’ll make up for it soon.

      I had mixed feelings about the motorized boats. They’re allowed a little over 100 miles up river. I believe they can’t go beyond that. If I were to do the trip again, I’d definitely prefer a raft or kayak. I imagine there was quite a bit of politics involved since the history of the boats goes back to 1883 with the first mail boat delivering to settlers along the river. Around 1930, the mail run had evolved to using motorized boats and started carrying passengers. Eventually it became the tourist attraction it is now. In 1968 the Rogue was one of the original eight rivers named in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. I haven’t dug into the actual history, but I’d imagine that the boats were grandfathered in at that time. (Political expediency?) Further up river, a limited number of permits are issued to restrict the numbers of users on this “wild” section.

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        • Thank you for your comment. I’m not anti boat either, but this particular river was so stunningly gorgeous that I would have preferred a more peaceful and serene trip with more time to savor the journey. Nevertheless, the jet boat allowed a whole lot more folks to enjoy it. I think, as in all things, there has to be some balance. And Happy Autumn back atcha….

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  1. Beautiful shots, Gunta. I can definitely imagine peaceful & serene – I’m glad they restrict the numbers. And I’m glad you had the opportunity to experience this beauty in all it’s glory.

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    • It’s a beautiful river. The river close to the same size nearest me is a lot calmer and seems to have more large tributaries, plus it has a lot more development along the banks. It’s pretty special that they decided to preserve some of that wildness on the Rogue.

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    • So sorry you don’t have rivers like that. I almost take them for granted around here. Even in Utah which is a lot of desert, we have rivers which come mostly from snow melting off the mountaintops.

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  2. Oh, I loved that movie so much. 🙂 What beautiful river scenes, Gunta, and that seal does look rather uncomfortable, almost as though he were posing especially for the photo. I’m sure he has other things on his mind though; very fishy things. 🙂

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    • I haven’t seen the movie, but I put it on my Netflix list. Should have it in a couple of days I expect. I love Meryl Streep. Don’t know how I missed that one.
      The seal looked none too pleased at us staring at him or interrupting his search for supper.

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  3. Quite beautiful, Miss Gunta…I think I’d have a hard time leaving…boss would call the PD wanting to file a missing-person’s report, saying I didn’t show and didn’t call…how unlike me…must have come into some type of trouble…wife would think a bear ate me…kids would think I got tired of picking up their socks…and I’d be loving the quiet with a harbor seal named “Spot” who eats too much of the locals’ fish…. Could there be any better life…? 😉

    Thank you for sharing your wonderful photos, my friend….

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    • I’m very happy to share them indeed. Would not want these scenes to cause you to go missing, though. I do however admit that we have some beautiful country here. We were told that all the bears had moved up and away from the river banks in search of huckleberries which seem to prefer those regions.
      BTW, Spot sends his regards….

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      • Well…don’t know if they would actually cause me to go missing, but it’s a tempting thought. 😉 And yes, I do rather admire all of your beautiful country up there, bears and seals, double-breasted cormorants, etc…. Thank you for the greetings from Spot.

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    • Oregon is, indeed, an amazing state. I feel really ambivalent about spreading the word because I have this urge to keep it that way! As for the seals…. I DO think they’re so cute even if they do compete for the fish I also love to eat.

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    • Thank you so much! They do restrict the numbers and they need permits to go on the river. I suppose it allows more folks (like me) to enjoy the river, so it’s a fine balance…

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