a matter of scale

I did promise to get a person in front of that massive driftwood stump to give y’all an idea of the size of that monster. In case you’re just joining us the original post was here.I’m a smidgeon over five feet tall….My occasional walking companion on the backside of the huge chunk of driftwood stump. You might guess by our attire that it was cold and windy yesterday evening.A glimpse of the fog closing in again. What I find most fascinating is that we never know what sort of weather we’ll find once we get right down to the beach because it can be so different just less than a mile inland. Or it can change in a heartbeat. Unlike a lot of folks, I actually prefer the cooler, sulkier weather over a hot tropical beach any day.Thanks to a question in comments, I’ve added this shot of what looks to me like a recent carving that might indicate the tree was originally a redwood. Note the reddish color of the two “K’s”. I’m certainly no expert, but that looks pretty close to the color of our redwoods.

There’s a wonderful video clip (about 6 min. long) that gives you a pretty good feel for the size of the Redwoods. Click here to watch it.

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29 thoughts on “a matter of scale

  1. Hello Gunta! I loved the photo of you! I think that’s the first time I’ve ever seen the face behind the blog. Magnificent views. I can imagine on a wild stormy day it can be quite dramatic to be out in the elements. We live right by the sea too but it’s always quite mild except for the lashing winds which sometimes makes me feel I’d be carried off my feet 😀 Beautiful driftwood. The largest I’ve ever seen. Sharon

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    • Seems like I hide behind the camera most of the time. I visited your country twice. Sadly they were very short stop overs on my way to Latvia many, many years ago. I very much liked what I did manage to see in Helsinki. The ferry trip makes me think that the Baltic is a lot calmer than my Pacific Ocean. 😉

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  2. Incredible, Gunta…hugely so…and with that photo of your friend, we can tell that the remaining, visible cut surface isn’t even half of what the whole stump/tree would be…oh, how wonderful is our natural world…. 🙂

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      • You’re welcome…and yes, have been falling in love with her over and over again these last two years! Your tree stump is very fascinating all by itself…and then put it out on the coast that way with all of the glyphs on it…and yes, much imagining. 🙂

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  3. Great shots Gunta…..it looks like that MASSIVE stump may have had the trunk cut during a logging operation?? It would be fascinating to get some forestry history on the type of tree, age at the time of the cutting and approximate time in the water….my imagination it going wild….,What an interesting find Ms “G”!!….

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    • Thanks! (this sounds like Kirsten – though you came in as anonymous). It sure looks like it had been logged. Wish I could snag me someone from Forestry to give me the skinny on this chunk of wood.

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    • I’ve discovered that a person seems to be the best way to offer perspective on size. Finding a likely stranger didn’t pan out, so I hauled my friend along on a hike. She’s quite willing to head to the beach with me whenever she has the time.

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  4. A perfect key to the size 🙂 Has it always been there or arrived recently? Just thought it might be good to mark on it where it was on a certain date to see if it lands somewhere else. Looks like you were right about the redwood. Glad that you’re keeping cool 😉

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    • If I had to guess… it somehow got itself stuck behind some of those sea stacks. I will definitely keep an eye on it to see if it moves, but I’m thinking it would need some freakish storm to move it from where it is now. Then again they keep predicting that we’re overdue for an earthquake which might provide a tsunami to budge the thing. The truly amazing bit is how a storm surge can toss these waterlogged, monster sized hunks of driftwood around like they were matchsticks. Judging by the dates scattered on it, it seems to have arrived on the beach in the early 90s. If it truly is a redwood, it won’t easily deteriorate… so, watching what happens will definitely be of interest. 😉

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    • It is rather interesting to think it might have once been a redwood. On the flip side, it’s a sad reminder of how the mighty redwoods have been decimated since it’s obvious that it’s a stump from a logging operation.

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    • Thanks ad. Ummm… I don’t mean to brag, but that stump doesn’t come close to some of the bigger trees that used to grow around here. Sadly there are few of the really huge giants left standing except for those in protected parks.

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        • AD….. you really need to make a trip out here to see the Redwoods for yourself. I guarantee that they are like nothing else you’ve ever experienced. I think of my trips down into Redwood country as something close to a religious experience. I added a link to the post that should give you a better idea of their true size.

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    • Thanks for asking, Andrew. I hadn’t given it much thought, but I took a look at other shots of carvings and came up with what seems to suggest it is, indeed, a redwood. I added the picture to the original post so you can see for yourself.

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  5. These photos are simply amazing. I never could have imagined that a piece of driftwood could be so big. Do you think it came from the Tsunami in Japan? If so I think biologists and botanists are quite concerned about what may be attached to it…They’ve spotted a lot of invasive species washing ashore all the way from Japan.

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    • No, it’s highly doubtful it came from Japan. It’s located on a beach in the Pacific Northwest where trees that size, or bigger, are not at all unusual. I’ve seen plenty of other specimens that size or larger on the beaches here. If you go to the previous post I linked to, you’ll see dated initials that seem to suggest that stump has been there for at least a decade. It has gotten itself trapped behind a bunch of sea stacks somehow, but may eventually drift back out if we have our own tsunami here or through some other strange fluke. 😉

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